Saturday, July 26, 2014

Published 11:54 AM by with 4 comments

Slowing Down and Being Prepared

Before we begin our big journey across the United States, we have some things to take care of locally so we are camped out in my home neighborhood of Issaquah for a few weeks. 

No slouch in the historical department, Issaquah city was incorporated back in 1885 with mining as its main industry. The name itself has been bastardized from the Native American language meaning either "the sound of birds," "snake," or "little stream." It has a quaint downtown area that I enjoy visiting every now and then.

I wasn't too enthusiastic to go out shooting in a place I had been to many times but I considered it a challenge to go find something fresh and interesting. I have a tendency to rush all over the place, getting things done so part of my challenge was to slow things down and really take the time to "see" what was around me.


All the lines and shadows are clean and stark but the human traces tell some kind of story

I love everything vintage so it thrilled me to see this outside a bicycle shop.
This sculpture is a full-size replica. I loved the dynamic shape. Reminded me of the horse sculpture near The Gorge
How could I pass up this scene? It kinda has a Walter White vibe about it.
I'm always on the lookout for events going on in my area. It's an excuse to mix among the camera-carrying townsfolk and not stick out quite so much with my big ass camera and lens. 

While on the city website one day, I noticed an upcoming event called Burgers, Bikers & Babes. Now, who am I to pass up such a community event? When I got there, they were just setting everything up. It was a really hot day and I didn't feel being a crispy critter in my all-dark clothing. It would be hours before the event really began and I wasn't about to sit around. 

About the only shot I cared about was of this lady on a motorcycle. She was Miss Whatsherface (I don't remember her exact title but the equivalent of a local beauty queen). 


When she posed for this shot, every guy with a camera started snapping. She was amused with her paparazzi attention.

Okay, this guy was interesting too. He was the frontman for a seventies cover band

So here's what I learned about myself.

1. I'm always in a hurry and don't take the time I should to fully notice the world around me. Having tried it on my walkabout in Issaquah, I kinda liked it and simply would not have been aware of some of the things I found worth shooting.

2. I need to be more prepared for the weather. When I arrived at that biker event, I was already roasting and had no hat or sunscreen. If I'd thought about it ahead of time, I probably would have stayed longer and gotten some better shots. 

3. Sometimes I just need to put down the camera and experience life unencumbered by a viewfinder. It's a hard habit to break.
      edit

4 comments:

Fred Wishnie said...

Can't imagine what treasures you'll discover when you get rolling.

dreamjosie said...

I love your lessons learned. I think the last one is the hardest

Glenn Lacey said...

Slowing down and seeing, that is everything. I think enjoying and fully engaging in the experience can be the most fulfilling part of taking a picture. I love these blog posts, they're inspiring.

Glenn Lacey said...

Slowing down and seeing, that is everything. I think enjoying and fully engaging in the experience can be the most fulfilling part of taking a picture. I love these blog posts, they're inspiring.